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That he had some such Repository for his Notions, (and it were well if those that are more knowing and Contemplative would be thus commendably pro­vident,) is intimated in the from birth to cast accompts, with other Mathematical calculations, to know moneys and the use thereof, to understand by sight of others writing and express by their own whatsoever may pass for civil life and conversation.

are very intelligible, and there is scarce any tolerable sense made of them in some other Versions; but in his Translation and Notes the importance of them is very easie and natural, and agreeable to the mind of the Original: whereby is verified what he in a Letter of his to no little sport.) For me here to make a judgment upon these two so distant Methods of Inter­pretation, (if it were fit, yet) it is needless; both of them being brought into view and impartially compared, and the Author's Method undeniably evinced to be the better, and fully vindicated from the little pretensions of the contrary party; and all this perform'd by one not only of the same University, but of the same Colledge too; which renders the performance more decorous and graceful, it being as well a be­coming testimony of a fair and worthy respect to the Author's memory, as a seasonable service to the Truth it self.

That upon the View of all the Author's Writings, it seem'd most ac­commodate for the Reader's benefit, that they should be digested into as every one knows that is ac­quainted with that excellent Author:) yet because where these Notions are repeated by him in other Tracts, they are express'd with some variety, and sometimes with farther advantage and clearness; I thought it safest not to leave out any thing, nor to go about to contract them: For the same Noti­ons being represented with some enlargements or some difference of expressi­on, may haply enlighten and affect some Readers in this form of words, others in another.

The not soon enough to my hands to he inserted there.

of 1556; see Mortimer, R., Italian 16th-cent., 511.

But to put a stop to this pleasing Digression, and to conclude this First Ad­vertisement, one thing more I would add, which I can affirm with a safe con­fidence, That if in any passages of these Papers I either did or do yet demurr for the present; (and it need be no wonder if, in so Voluminous a Collection as this, enrich'd with so great a variety of Notions, one should chance some­times ) yet have I in those very Passages express'd as great a diligence and faithfulness as in any other particulars of those Discourses and Treatises wherein I did most fully accord with the Author.2.

Works of this Great Author, printed at distant times since his Death, have been with care and attention more than once collated and ex­amin'd by the Author's own Manuscripts; that so upon a second, and some­times a third, reading it might appear where the Prints differ'd from the Ori­ginals, and that thereby they might be restored to that Lustre and Perfection wherein the Author left them.

How it is for others, the judi­cious Reader will easily discern upon the perusal of this Edition, where he will find the Author's Notions to run more clear and smooth, now that they are freed from any interpolations and imperfections that had crept into any of the former Prints.

In three other places there was a word wanting in the Author's Manuscript, and what word was plainly fit to be inserted, I have enclosed in a different letter in these two crotchets [], and accordingly given notice thereof in the mar­gins.

Which I here intimate as an Instance of that Diligence and Fidelity I thought my self bound to use in the preparing these Papers for the Press; en­deavouring all along so to deal herein as I my self would be dealt with in the like circumstances, as being mindful of that Rule of our Saviour Christ; A most equi­table and obliging Rule, the observance whereof (besides the good effect it would have as to the publick interest of Learning, as in the particular case for which I here remember it) would have a propitious and prevailing in­fluence to the bettering of all the affairs and transactions of humane life.

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