Dating prints

He was one of the Earliest Moku Hanga Artists but he did not gain any great appreciation or recognition until after the Second World War when his style and skill was accepted by a wide audience and he won a number of awards in Japan.TOKURIKI, TOMIKICHIRO (1902-2000) was the 12th generation of artists in his Family.KUNISADA, UTAGAWA was born in the Honjo district in 1786.He entered the school of Utagawa Toyokuni the 1st (1786 to 1825) around 1800 as an apprentice at the age of 14.The hand made paper used for these prints is called Washi and made from tree bark usually taken from mulberry trees which makes it strong and capable of being soaked in water then dried.The set of woodblocks are capable of printing a maximum of 3000 prints and the process involves soaking the Washi, painting the coloured ink pigments onto an individual carved woodblock, laying the wet Washi onto the block and rubbing the exposed back of the paper with a rounded wooden object called a Barron until the colour has been absorbed into the washi.Once completed this partial print is dried, usually taking about a week then the process is repeated for the next woodblock until all six woodblocks have been printed and the entire picture can be seen.There are groupings of Japanese woodblock prints often called schools and these are: Another commonly used term for Japanese woodblock prints is Ukiyo-e.

He was an alcoholic and playboy but created excellent scenes of everyday life, Kabuki drama and the beautiful women who had become part of his lifestyle.His series ASANO, TAKEJI was born in Kyoto in 1900 and lived to 1999. During his Life he Created Over 600 Different Woodblock Scenes and he is Recognised as one of Most Prolific and Most Talented of Shin Hanga Artists.In 1930, along with other members of the Creative Print Society, he contributed to a series of prints titled “Creative Prints of Twelve Months in New Kyoto” (Sosaku-hanga shin Kyoto junikagetsu). It is no wonder that a Year Prior to his Death he was Honored with the Title of a Living National Treasure. He was Born in Asakusa, Tokyo, and became a student of Kiyotaka at the Age of 13.Please contact us via email for shipping costs and payment details.Japanese woodblock prints are created by hand carving a number of flat blocks of wood which each display a portion of the total scene to be depicted.

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