Intimidating behaviour definition

For more information on ASBOs and anti-social behaviour in general, see our sections.One of the most common forms of harassment is malicious or nuisance telephone calls. Abusive, annoying, harassing, obscene or threatening telephone calls are an invasion of your privacy.This carries a £1,000 fine or a penalty notice of £80.If the offence is committed with intent to cause harassment, alarm or distress, the offender can be given 6 months' imprisonment or a fine. S1 (1) of the Protection from Harassment Act 1997 and Article 3(1) of the Protection from Harassment (Northern Ireland) Order 1997 state: A person must not pursue a course of conduct: Harassment is defined as causing alarm or causing distress, and a course of conduct which can include speech must involve conduct on at least 2 occasions.Conditions of the orders may include a ban from the area where the victims live or a specific ban on approaching or communicating with the victims.

If the Head of Institution is not able to resolve the issue, the complaint will be taken forward by the Director of Human Resources.All members of the University should consider their own behaviour and the impact that this can have on others.The University recognises that personalities, characters and management styles may differ but, notwithstanding these differences, as a minimum standard all staff are expected to: The University has a framework of behavioural attributes which communicates the behaviours that are valued in the University of Cambridge. Unacceptable behaviour Unacceptable behaviour (including bullying, harassment and victimisation), may involve actions, words or physical gestures that could reasonably be perceived to be the cause of another person’s distress or discomfort.Where action is taken in a county court in Scotland and Northern Ireland, an ASBO can be made against a party to the main proceedings or another adult whose conduct is material to the proceedings.In England and Wales a Criminal Behaviour Order may be obtained where an offender has been convicted of an offence and has engaged, or is likely to engage, in conduct likely to cause harassment, distress or alarm to others and the order is likely to prevent this in the future.

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