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Women are usually nurses, models, charity or UNICEF workers or antique dealers.After they establish some lovely correspondence with you, fall in love and maybe even send a couple of cheap presents, they will either: a) be almost on their way to meet you, but something will happen to them: they will get robbed, beaten, get into the hospital, or other misfortune will happen and of course you will be their only contact to ask for financial help, or: b) tell you that their employer pays them with Money Orders or checks, and they can't cash them in Nigeria.Never re-ship anything for strangers, especially to Africa.There is a reason why online merchants usually don't ship there. Then you may do what seems like the next best thing and just type the company name into a search engine. Can they use your bank account to hold their money? They just need access to your bank account to set up the transfer. "Be delieve trough (US MAIL)" — That's not an autocorrect fail. And even if law enforcement pinpointed the exact identity of the scammer, the perp would have to be extradited to the U. Because they have so many people on their payroll — about 30 percent of scammers' earnings go to paying bribes — it's difficult for Nigerian and international policing agencies to track down specific individuals.Then, once you hand over your banking info and pay a "small fee" to cover the expenses related to the transfer, the so-called "prince" sucks your savings dry. If an unsolicited email reads like a drunk text, it's probably a hoax. That's a clear sign that Sandra doesn't know what the hell she's talking about. Spare yourself the trauma of a drawn-out, potentially inconclusive criminal investigation.The Nigerian scam is also called the "419" scam because 419 is the article of the Nigerian penal code that prosecutes fraud. Your best defense against a Nigerian scam is not to fall for it in the first place.

They are widely used in order to make websites operate, function more efficiently, or to provide business and marketing information.There are also military scams (for God Sake, there are NO American Generals browsing dating sites and NO military man will EVER ask you for money.Then there is a recovery scam - a scammer recontacting you pretending to be FBI, EFCC or any other authority, telling he can help you recover your money... And finaly there is a "stuck parcel" scam, when they supposedly sent you goods/gifts, but they got stuck somewhere on the way (for example, on the customs) and you have to pay to "customs" or some bogus shipping company to get them.usually involves this scheme: the scammers upload fake attractive photos, in most cases of white people.They pretend to be the foreign specialists working in Nigeria or Ghana (usually originally from US and UK, but it may also be Canada, Australia or any other European country).

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